Republican Sen. Jeff Flake won't run for re-election

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Jeff Flake, a vocal intra-party critic of President Donald Trump, announced he will not seek reelection in 2018.

The US president is now embroiled in a row with another Republican Senator, Bob Corker. The news of his impending retirement comes on the heels of another announcement from another moderate, Senator Bob Corker.

Flake's decision comes amid Trump's feuds with critical GOP senators.

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He's been struggling in the polls following his tangles with Trump.

Will Allison, Flake's campaign spokesman, confirms to CNN that he is not running.

"It would require me to believe in positions I don't hold on such issues as trade and immigration and it would require me to condone behavior that I can not condone".

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Flake is expected to detail why he's not seeking re-election later today on the Senate floor, but he already says the nastiness of GOP politics in the era of President Trump is a main factor.

U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake (R) Arizona, hopes to retain his U.S. Senate seat, but republican challenger Kelli Ward, left and U.S. Rep Kyrsten Sinema (D) Arizona, will likely present tough challenges for him.

Sen. John McCain, who also drew Trump's ire for going against some of his priorities, thanked Flake for his service in a tweet.

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