Tom Wolfe dies at 87

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Described as a "chronicler and satirist of American culture", Wolfe believed that the only way to tell a great story was to go out and report it. Wolfe edited a volume of work by himself and other prominent writers of the era, including Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, George Plimpton, titled "The New Journalism".

In a span of 16 years, Wolfe produced nine nonfiction books, including one of his most famous, "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test", in which he hit the road in a psychedelic bus with writer Ken Kesey and his so-called band of Merry Pranksters bent on turning the world on to LSD.

No further details were immediately available. In addition to his influence on literature and journalism, Wolfe is also credited with coining terms such as "radical chic" and "the Me Decade", in reference to the 1970s. "But now he will no longer belong to us".

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Wolfe started as a reporter at the Springfield (Massachusetts) Union before moving onto the Washington Post.

Born in Richmond, Virginia, Wolfe attended St. Christopher's college prep school.

Wolfe received numerous awards over the course of his career and not all tongue-in-cheek like the Bad Sex In Fiction Award.

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In 1979, he published The Right Stuff, a portrait of American heroism, viewed through the exploits of military test pilots and astronauts known as the Mercury Seven, which was made into a successful movie in 1983.

Tom Wolfe is survived by his wife, Shelia, and his children, Alexandra and Thomas.

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